Johannes Canuti Lenaeus

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The Most Reverend

Johannes Canuti Lenaeus
Archbishop of Uppsala
Primate of Sweden
Johannes Canuti Lenaeus (1573-1669).jpg
ChurchChurch of Sweden
ArchdioceseUppsala
Appointed1647
In office1647–1669
PredecessorLaurentius Paulinus Gothus
SuccessorLars Stigzelius
Orders
Consecration14 March 1647
by Jonas Magni Wexionensis
RankMetropolitan Archbishop
Personal details
Born29 November 1573
Lena, Uppland, Sweden
Died23 April 1669(1669-04-23) (aged 95)
Uppsala, Sweden
NationalitySwede
ParentsCanutus Petri Gestricius
Margareta Persdotter
SpouseCatharina Kenicia
Alma materUppsala University

Johannes Canuti Lenaeus (29 November 1573 – 23 April 1669) was a professor at Uppsala University and Archbishop of Uppsala in the Church of Sweden.[1]

Biography[edit]

Lenaeus was born at Länna parish in Uppland, Sweden where his father was parish priest. After several years of studies, mainly in Germany at universities in Rostock[2] and Wittenberg, he was appointed professor of logic at Uppsala University in 1604. After being ordained priest, he was in 1613 also appointed deputy vice-rector and professor of theology. After more studies in Germany, he was also appointed professor in Greek and Hebrew. In 1638, he was named the first theology professor and clergyman at Uppsala. Lenaeus was appointed Archbishop in 1647.

He text he wrote, Logica peripatetica (1633), gave a revival to the philosophy of peripatetics (Aristotelian philosophy). [3]

Lenaeus was married in 1612 with Catharina Kenicia, daughter of Petrus Kenicius who was Archbishop of Uppsala from 1609 to his death in 1636. [4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Johannes Canuti Lenæus". Svenskt biografiskt lexikon. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  2. ^ See entry of Johannes Canuti Lenaeus in the Rostock Matrikelportal
  3. ^ Lenæus, Johannes Canuti (1633). "Johannis Canuti Lenæi Logica peripatetica". books.google.com. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  4. ^ "Petrus Kenicius, ärkebiskop". Svenskt biografiskt lexikon. Retrieved April 1, 2020.

Other sources[edit]